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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? – 18 June 2018
2018-06-18 05:00 UTC by Michelle

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? Button
Hosted by Kathryn from Book Date, this is a weekly event to share what we’ve read in the past week and what we hope to read, plus whatever else comes to mind. Here is what I read the week ending 18 June 2018. To learn more about each book, just click on the book cover!

It’s been quite the week. I did not get done quite as much reading as I had hoped, but two out of the three books were absolutely fantastic. Plus, I am three books away from finishing my May review copies and the books I have left are the ones I have been most anticipating. I am excited about being able to start June books in June. (It’s the little things.)


FINISHED SINCE THE LAST UPDATE:

Furyborn by Claire Legrand The Glitch by Elisabeth Cohen Legendary by Stephanie Garber

Claire Legrand’s latest novel is fascinating but reader be warned. It is a difficult one. The story is complex and written in such a way that you learn about the world only in the context of the heroine’s situations. There are no paragraphs of descriptions or explanations to discuss the socio-political nature of the world. There are no history lessons to explain current events.  If you miss a clue, then you are left not quite understanding what happens later. That being said, I loved it. Yes, it has magic and strong women, but I loved that we have to work for answers. I loved being shown and not being told anything. I loved being forced to put together the clues because it made the answers more rewarding. I am fascinated by the two worlds Ms. Legrand created and am very excited to see where the story goes next.

After reading some of the reviews for Elisabeth Cohen’s novel, I can see why reactions are mixed. To me, it reads like Jane Austen – heavily satirical. Very heavily satirical. As in, you have to take every word Shelley thinks and says with a grain of salt. The other issue I see with the novel is that unless you have experience working in the business world, you are going to miss a lot. The whole novel is mocking business buzz words and thought processes. If you don’t know them, you can’t understand why they are funny in the context of the novel. I personally got quite a chuckle out of this one because Shelley is the living embodiment of every business practice and thought process set forth by any so-called expert. She is not meant to be likeable; she is meant to make a point, which she does very well.

The sequel to Stephanie Garber’s magical Caraval series is everything I wanted and more. I want to crawl inside the pages and live in this world. It did take me a bit to realize that the story is about the OTHER sister this time around, but once I got that I fell in love. Hard. It has been a long time since I mourned finishing a novel, but I was seriously bereft when I finished this one. I want to go back and read the first novel again just to experience this world all over again.


DID NOT FINISH:

Nothing


CURRENT READ:

The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware


CURRENT LISTEN:

Exit West by Mohsid Hamid


NEXT UP:

May Review Copies:

Lifel1k3 by Jay Kristoff All the Little Lights by Jamie McGuire Shelter in Place by Nora Roberts


So, what are you reading?

The post It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? – 18 June 2018 appeared first on That's What She Read.

Weekly Top Posts: 2018-06-17
2018-06-17 04:00 UTC

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  4. www.netgalley.com
  5. www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button

What’s for Dinner? – Week Starting 9 June 2018
2018-06-16 05:00 UTC by Michelle

What's For Dinner Button

People are forever asking how I manage everything with such a busy schedule. I love to cook, but I don’t always have time to do so in the manner I would like. This weekly journal is a way to keep it real and show that while my intentions are good, sometimes life and all of its activities get in the way of serving a delicious, home-cooked meal and that it is perfectly okay.

  • ********************

  • Saturday: I don’t normally cook on Saturdays, but Jim was leaving for a business trip early the next morning and I had thawed some shrimp earlier in the week that I needed to use. So I tried my hand at Bang Bang Shrimp Tacos. They were delicious, but frying that many shrimp in a skillet is a pain in the ass. Unless someone gifts me a fryer, I don’t see me making this recipe again, no matter how much we all enjoyed it.
  • Sunday: With Jim gone, I could have taken the easy way out and ordered takeout. Instead, I tried yet another copycat Skyline Chili recipe in a six-year-long search to find one that truly tastes like the original. I have tried so many over the years. Some have been closer than others. Connor declared this one the closest yet and told me that he would accept this particular recipe as a substitute if he couldn’t have the original. Later this week, we are going to try it again over hot dogs to make homemade cheese coneys to really put it to the test.
  • Monday: With Jim gone, easy recipes were in order. Tonight’s dinner was tacos. Regular beef (or black bean for Holly) tacos. No fancy accoutrements. No crazy prep or work instructions. It was perfect.
  • Tuesday: With obedience class tonight, a quick dinner was necessary. So it seemed like a good time to try out the chili from Sunday on hot dogs to see if the flavor still matches the original. It turns out that it does not quite match. Which means I have a recipe to tweak. But Connor devoured three hot dogs and a side of chili cheese fries, so I think it is pretty darn close.
  • Wednesday: Jim returned from his trip just in time to celebrate 21 years of marriage together. We ended up going out to a special event at a new restaurant that opened up over the winter. It was a Pig and Brew event, pairing pork from a local farm and beer from a local brewery. The food was ah-mazing, and the beer was excellent. Jim and I were so impressed with everything, especially the fact that all of the food is locally sourced. We already made plans to go back and try their regular menu. And maybe their crazy Father’s Day brunch menu.
  • Thursday: It was another leftover/fend-for-yourself night, as we were all busy doing our own thing and sort of forgot about dinner. This is what happens when I am not home to steer my family, I fear.
  • Friday: Another night where we all kind of scattered just in time for dinner. I had made a seven-layer salad for a potluck today, so Jim and I ate the leftovers. Jim in the meantime brought home some leftover chicken from his worked catered lunch. Connor are that, and poor Holly was left with a sandwich. The thing is no one complained. Sometimes, I think everyone likes these informal scrambles for food. It certainly makes my life easier.

********************

What was for dinner at your house this week?

The post What’s for Dinner? – Week Starting 9 June 2018 appeared first on That's What She Read.

Fabulous Friday – 15 June 2018
2018-06-15 05:00 UTC by Michelle

Fabulous Friday Button

We should always find ways to celebrate the little things in life. What better day to celebrate these little things than the best day of the week? So, here are the things that make this a Fabulous Friday for me this week.

********************

  • IT’S ALL GOOD – Holly is off of school. Connor is working. Jim is working. I am working. Holly has no evening dance classes for another two weeks. The weather has been fantastic. Everyone is getting along. The pups are great. Work is slow. Things are going pretty well these days.

 

*********************

What makes this a Fabulous Friday for you?

The post Fabulous Friday – 15 June 2018 appeared first on That's What She Read.

When ghosts are boring
2018-06-14 05:00 UTC by Michelle

Paper Ghosts by Julia Heaberlin

BOTTOM LINE: Skip it.

Genre: Suspense; Thriller
Publication Date: 15 May 2018
Source: Publisher via NetGalley

Synopsis from the Publisher:

“An obsessive young woman has been waiting half her life—since she was twelve years old—for this moment. She has planned. Researched. Trained. Imagined every scenario. Now she is almost certain the man who kidnapped and murdered her sister sits in the passenger seat beside her.

Carl Louis Feldman is a documentary photographer who may or may not have dementia—and may or may not be a serial killer. The young woman claims to be his long-lost daughter. He doesn’t believe her. He claims no memory of murdering girls across Texas, in a string of places where he shot eerie pictures. She doesn’t believe him.

Determined to find the truth, she lures him out of a halfway house and proposes a dangerous idea: a ten-day road trip, just the two of them, to examine cold cases linked to his haunting photographs.

Is he a liar or a broken old man? Is he a pathological con artist? Or is she? In Paper Ghosts, Julia Heaberlin once again swerves the serial killer genre in a new direction. You won’t see the final, terrifying twist spinning your way until the very last mile.”

My Thoughts: By all accounts, Paper Ghosts should be a good novel. With its cat-and-mouse tale between potential serial killer and potential victim/victim’s sister, you would think this would be a novel that gets your heart pounding and your pulse racing. This should be a book you read in one sitting. And yet, it is anything but that.

Instead, it is a novel that is so introspective that it is boring. It is a novel you question why you are reading it because nothing happens for the first half of the book. You spend so much time in the narrator’s head, and she spends most of the time rehashing the steps she took to prepare her for this journey, that you wonder whether there is any point to the story. You question where the suspense is and contemplate quitting the story multiple times.

It mildly improves once you reach the halfway point, and if you make it that far you continue only because you want closure. Yet the closure you receive is inadequate, open-ended and leaving room for a potential sequel you have no interest in reading. It leaves you disappointed that there is not more there to capture your interest and to create tension. You regret the decision to keep reading it because the fizzle at the end is not what you hoped would happen.

Having not read Ms. Heaberlin’s first novel but having read many a gushing review of it, I had high hopes about Paper Ghosts. Perhaps that is the issue, but I suspect not. The story is not set up to be a psychological thriller given the interplay between the two characters, yet that is exactly what Ms. Heaberlin ended up writing. We are in the narrator’s head too much, which cancels out the little action that occurs and creates an unending series of disappointments as the story never takes off the way it should. I do plan to go back and read that first novel of hers one day, if only to compare the two novels. However, Paper Ghosts left such a poor impression that I am unfortunately hesitant to read anything else she might write in the future.

The post When ghosts are boring appeared first on That's What She Read.

Space is terrifying
2018-06-13 05:00 UTC by Michelle

Obscura by Joe Hart

BOTTOM LINE: Not what I was expecting but SO much better

Genre: Science Fiction
Publication Date: 8 May 2018
Source: Publisher via NetGalley

Synopsis from the Publisher:

“In the near future, an aggressive and terrifying new form of dementia is affecting victims of all ages. The cause is unknown, and the symptoms are disturbing. Dr. Gillian Ryan is on the cutting edge of research and desperately determined to find a cure. She’s already lost her husband to the disease, and now her young daughter is slowly succumbing as well. After losing her funding, she is given the unique opportunity to expand her research. She will travel with a NASA team to a space station where the crew has been stricken with symptoms of a similar inexplicable psychosis–memory loss, trances, and violent, uncontrollable impulses.

Crippled by a secret addiction and suffering from creeping paranoia, Gillian finds her journey becoming a nightmare as unexplainable and violent events plague the mission. With her grip weakening on reality, she starts to doubt her own innocence. And she’s beginning to question so much more–like the true nature of the mission, the motivations of the crew, and every deadly new secret space has to offer.”

My Thoughts: When looking at galleys to request for reading and reviewing, I always look for stories that are intriguing, often involving subject matters I find interesting or in genres I enjoy. You never know for certain whether your hopes for a good novel will come to fruition, so each galley is a bit like a leap of faith in which you put your trust in the author to tell a well-written and entertaining story. The leap becomes just that much larger when there is no buzz surrounding a novel or one that is not getting a lot of attention from other reviewers. This is how I felt about Obscura, a novel which I should enjoy given its suspenseful premise and the fact that it takes place in space – two of my story-selecting forms of kryptonite. I do not anyone else who has read it, so there is no buzz, no word-of-mouth to shed some light on the story or at least provide some form of reaction about it. So, opening to that first page was a leap in a way. It is one of the few times I have gone into a novel really not knowing anything more than what the synopsis told me.

Now that I finished the story, I can say that the leap was totally worth it. The story is intense; think horror movie intense. Gillian is alone on a ship in space for most of the novel, except strange things keep occurring that should not be happening if she were truly alone. Not only do you have the fear of the unknown, you have the fear of technology and the fear of absolute loneliness playing with each other. Add to that mental impairment that comes with drug withdrawals and abject grief, and you have a recipe for one of the scarier novels you will read.

Gillian makes for an excellent heroine. She is highly intelligent and fiercely independent yet extremely vulnerable given the losses in her life. She is battling a painkiller addiction, which makes her an unreliable narrator. However, when the truth reveals itself, she becomes the ultimate hero, doing what needs to be done for the best resolution possible, even if it involves the ultimate sacrifice. Her flaws make her real; her determination makes her admirable. She is a character with whom it is easy to sympathize and for whom it is easy to cheer.

The story itself is heart-pounding almost from the opening chapter. You are immediately thrust into the action so that Gillian’s nervousness becomes your nervousness because you don’t know anything else. Gillian’s unreliability only becomes apparent as you understand the forces that put her into space. What happens while she is on the shuttle is downright terrifying as you know nothing and can only see the action through her very faulty eyes. The action on the shuttle is only half the story though. What follows after is crazy science fiction goodness, equally as intense as only a good sci-fi action story can be.

Obscura is the best type of gamble because I so thoroughly enjoyed the story, more than I ever imagined I would. I fell hard for Gillian and her plight, and everything that happened to her or around her while she was on the shuttle and after only served to increase my interest in her success. The writing is taut, providing balance between science and fiction, telling and showing. This is an action-adventure story, so one would not normally expect character development; however Gillian does grow as an individual throughout the mission, coming to realizations about her past and present behaviors that indicate greater self-awareness and an eagerness to get things right. I only wish I could bring greater attention to this fun and scary novel because it most definitely deserves to become a popular summer read.

The post Space is terrifying appeared first on That's What She Read.

Two books perfect for today’s enhanced social justice
2018-06-12 05:00 UTC by Michelle

The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner

Genre: Literary Fiction
Publication Date: 1 May 2018
Source: Publisher via NetGalley

Synopsis from the Publisher:

“It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision.”

Our Kind of Cruelty by Araminta Hall

Genre: Psychological Suspense
Publication Date: 8 May 2018
Source: Publisher via NetGalley

Synopsis from the Publisher:

“This is a love story. Mike’s love story.

Mike Hayes fought his way out of a brutal childhood and into a quiet, if lonely, life before he met Verity Metcalf. V taught him about love, and in return, Mike has dedicated his life to making her happy. He’s found the perfect home, the perfect job; he’s sculpted himself into the physical ideal V has always wanted. He knows they’ll be blissfully happy together.

It doesn’t matter that she hasn’t been returning his e-mails or phone calls.

It doesn’t matter that she says she’s marrying Angus.

It’s all just part of the secret game they used to play. If Mike watches V closely, he’ll see the signs. If he keeps track of her every move, he’ll know just when to come to her rescue . . .”

My Thoughts: For the most part, The Mars Room and Our Kind of Cruelty are two very different books. One has a female narrator, one a male. One takes place in the United States, the other in the United Kingdom. One involves people with little to nothing, the other involves people who have more money than they can spend. One reads like a memoir, the other reads like a love letter. There should be nothing that connects these two very different stories to one another, except there is one key element in both. The portrayal of the women, their supposed crimes, and subsequent punishments are unfair and but unfortunately all too commonplace in society’s ongoing perpetuation of rape culture.

In The Mars Room, we get a down-and-dirty look at prison life for women and a glimpse into the milieu for which prison is one of the only options available to them. For those readers like me who grew up with a modicum of privilege, Romy’s life before her sentencing is an eye-opening experience. Ms. Kushner portrays the downtrodden – the homeless, the junkies, the alcoholics, the poorest of the poor – with dedication and delicacy, neither making excuses for them nor softening the harsh truths of their existence but doing so in a way that is not exploitative nor sensationalized. She portrays Romy’s life with empathy and an attention to detail that highlights her detailed research into the California prison system and experience of life on the streets. Given her careful research, it makes Romy’s case that much more infuriating – because you know this is one novel in which fiction is fact and that there is someone in Romy’s exact situation sitting in jail for the wrong reason and with no recourse for justice. The Mars Room is by no means an easy read, nor should it be for those who will never be forced to sell their body for money or who will never know what it feels like to literally have no food and no money to buy some. However, it is a book which should be required reading as it shines a light on the prison system and the prejudices and discrimination that exist for women within it.

While The Mars Room is a hard-hitting, behind-the-scenes true story type novel, Our Kind of Cruelty reminds me of Caroline Kepnes’ You. The problem is that Mike is no Joe, neither as well-read nor as charming. Mike’s tragic childhood does make him a sympathetic character and his love for V is as open and honest as you can get. Even while you start harboring doubts about Mike’s version of reality, you still want him to get the girl in the end. That is right until you realize towards what Ms. Hall is driving. By then, all bets are off.

Both novels are important in the light they shine on women and the justice system. The lack of justice in both novels is infuriating, which is exactly the point. In this era of heightened awareness of gender treatment, we should be outraged by the injustice both Romy and V experience because Romy and V are all women. Novels like The Mars Room and Our Kind of Cruelty are vital for increasing awareness even further and providing avenues of dialogue necessary to make much-needed changes. Women are angry, and our anger is beginning to trickle into the arts in greater numbers in hopes of fostering such dialogue. The Mars Room and Our Kind of Cruelty are two new examples of women using their anger for good and provide two fantastic examples of gender bias to use in our arguments challenging it.

The post Two books perfect for today’s enhanced social justice appeared first on That's What She Read.

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? – 11 June 2018
2018-06-11 05:00 UTC by Michelle

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? Button
Hosted by Kathryn from Book Date, this is a weekly event to share what we’ve read in the past week and what we hope to read, plus whatever else comes to mind. Here is what I read the week ending 11 June 2018. To learn more about each book, just click on the book cover!

Molly Harper saved the day! That and deleting game apps from my phone. It is amazing how much more reading time you find when you don’t have any other distractions on your phone.


FINISHED SINCE THE LAST UPDATE:

Sweet Tea and Sympathy by Molly Harper A Shout in the Ruins by Kevin Powers Onyx & Ivory by Mindee Arnett Tin Man by Sarah Winman

When the world as seemingly gone insane and when you are too busy to do much more than focus on the next thing that needs done, Molly Harper and Amanda Ronconi are there to bring a little bit of sanity and a whole bunch of comic relief back into your life. Or, that’s what I personally think. Ms. Harper’s Southern Eclectic series and this first full novel in said series is exactly what I wanted it to be – fun, charming, a bit sassy, a bit introspective, and a whole bunch of sweet. It is not earth-shattering literature. As far as romance novels go, there is not much there in the way of sexy times. Still, I love her characters, and I adore how she builds character development into the romance so that our leading lady is becoming a better person in general in addition to finding love. With this particular story, I especially enjoyed the idea of stepping away from the big city and the materialism that comes with living in an urban area and settling down into a slower, more relaxed way of living. The Harper/Ronconi duo never fails to soothe my weary soul, for which I am tremendously grateful.

I finished Kevin Powers’ new book wondering what the purpose of it was. While it was a rather depressing look at the side effects of the Civil War and the lasting impact into the twentieth century, I still don’t know what the point of it all was. Is it just a story? Is it trying to tell me something? Did I miss clues telling me what to look for while reading? I am not a fan of books that leave me scratching my head like this, even if the novel itself is perfectly decent.

The new series by Mindee Arnett starts out quite well. To be sure, it is a bit predictable and cliched, but there are some great moments as well. For one, no love triangle; there is a romance, but all doubts as to will they or won’t they are resolved by the end of the novel. It allows the story to unfold on its own, without the need for added and unnecessary drama. I may have figured out some of the big reveals, but the story veered in directions I did not expect most of the time. This means that there were plenty of welcome surprises for me, and those were enough to keep me invested in the story. While it is not the greatest fantasy trilogy beginning I have read, it is by no means the worst either. I even plan to continue the series with the next book, so there is that.

I read the Molly Harper novella as a precursor to her latest novel, which releases next week and for which I do have an electronic review copy. I flew threw this brief audiobook, entertained the entire time, and cannot wait to get to that review copy. If the novella is any indication, that next book is going to be so much fun.

Sarah Winman’s novel is a heartbreaking story of love and loss, and when I say heartbreaking I truly mean it. The love expressed in the novel by two of the characters is so pure and yet complicated that it will be the rare person who can read it without being affected in some way. At 224 pages, it is a relatively quick novel but one that is stuffed with all sorts of goodness.


DID NOT FINISH:

It’s been a good week.


CURRENT READ:

Furyborn by Claire Legrand


CURRENT LISTEN:

Exit West by Mohsid Hamid


NEXT UP:

May Review Copies:

The Glitch by Elisabeth Cohen Legendary by Stephanie Garber The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware Lifel1k3 by Jay Kristoff All the Little Lights by Jamie McGuire Shelter in Place by Nora Roberts


So, what are you reading?

The post It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? – 11 June 2018 appeared first on That's What She Read.

Sunday Reflections – 10 June 2018
2018-06-10 14:00 UTC by Michelle

Sunday Reflections Button

Happy Sunday!

I could get used to this more low-key schedule. It is so nice knowing there is nowhere we have to be at any given point in time. Helping things is the weather. It has been absolutely gorgeous. We have had the windows open all week, enjoying the breezes and nature soundtrack that is our yard. Looking at the forecast, it won’t even break into the upper 80s this week, so we can continue to enjoy the fresh air and birdsong. There is nothing quite like it for a relaxation method.

Holly officially graduated eighth grade this week and started her summer break on Friday. She celebrated by heading over to a friend’s house for a sleepover, something she has not been able to do all winter or spring. She is in the process of making a summer bucket list filled with day trips she would like to do this summer, which is the least we can do for her considering she did not have any time to play during the school year. I look forward to seeing what makes the list.

Connor is enjoying his internship and started his first of three projects on which he will be working. I have enjoyed his first glimpse of the business world, as his observations make me laugh. His indignation at things that are commonplace for office workers is, quite frankly, adorable. I am so glad he is getting this opportunity because it will lessen the culture shock when he gets out there on his own. Plus, we can guide him through the idiosyncrasies of office politics versus him making a faux pas later.

Jim is heading out for a business trip this week, so it will be the kids and me. It will be interesting to see how Connor fares without Dad to drive him to and from work every day. He normally sleeps during those trips, but now he has to drive himself. It should be interesting!

Otherwise, it is all quiet here. We have one more week of no dance to enjoy. Great weather. No obligations. This is about as good as it gets.

Have a wonderful weekend, everyone, and an even better week to come. I will see you here next week!

**********

Here are past posts from the last few weeks in case you missed them the first time:

The post Sunday Reflections – 10 June 2018 appeared first on That's What She Read.

Weekly Top Posts: 2018-06-10
2018-06-10 04:00 UTC

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What’s for Dinner? – Week Starting 2 June 2018
2018-06-09 05:00 UTC by Michelle

What's For Dinner Button

People are forever asking how I manage everything with such a busy schedule. I love to cook, but I don’t always have time to do so in the manner I would like. This weekly journal is a way to keep it real and show that while my intentions are good, sometimes life and all of its activities get in the way of serving a delicious, home-cooked meal and that it is perfectly okay.

  • ********************

  • Saturday: A day of chores meant no time to cook anything. Holly has been asking for Chipotle for a few days now, so she and I went and picked that up for dinner. Jim was not hungry at the time so later went back out and picked up his own dinner from Culver’s. He brought home custard for the three of us, so I was perfectly fine with this decision.
  • Sunday: After doing all the cooking last week because I was the only one who had time, I opted this week to assign cooking nights to each of the kids. Connor got tonight and made his dinner choice of potato chip casserole. Because it was easy and is one of my personal favorites, I let him make it. Next week, he will need to step up his game a bit.
  • Monday: It is Holly’s turn to cook this week, and she chose her favorite Lemon Risotto with roasted asparagus as a side. Risotto is easy to make but so time-consuming, so I am grateful that she stepped up to make it as it meant I did not have to sit at the stove for a good hour constantly stirring.
  • Tuesday: Tuesdays are a bit rough lately because we have Cletus’ obedience classes at 7 PM. It means making something quick and easy. I made this Mushroom and Garlic Spaghetti for all of us, which certainly was easy. There is something about the combination of mushrooms, garlic, and a good cheese like Pecorino Romano that makes this particularly tasty to me.
  • Wednesday: After a weird reaction to something, I was in no shape to cook tonight. The kids opted out of cooking as well, which is fine since they each had a turn. Jim’s cooking choice was to order pizza. I guess I am okay with that.
  • Thursday: Before the boys started grumbling about the lack of meat, I made a simple crispy Lemon Chicken with plenty of lemon zest mixed into the bread crumbs and lemon slices on top of the chicken. Easy, quick, and delicious – exactly what a meal should be and one that could be made because the girl was at a friend’s house for a sleepover.
  • Friday: It was Connor’s turn for a night away from home. Holly had a very late night and was feeling the effects of it in a lack of appetite. So Jim and I hit up Five Guys for a decadent meal. As a once-in-a-while meal, it’s pretty darn good.

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What was for dinner at your house this week?

The post What’s for Dinner? – Week Starting 2 June 2018 appeared first on That's What She Read.

Fabulous Friday – 8 June 2018
2018-06-08 05:00 UTC by Michelle

Fabulous Friday Button

We should always find ways to celebrate the little things in life. What better day to celebrate these little things than the best day of the week? So, here are the things that make this a Fabulous Friday for me this week.

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  • NO MORE TEACHERS, NO MORE BOOKS – Happy summer vacation!! I know it does not mean much to those of us who are not teachers or students, but there is still something exciting about not having to deal with homework, late bedtimes, morning alarms, missed buses, after-school activities, et cetera. Holly had a stellar but tough year, and I know she is ready for some rest. She deserves it too. A 4.0 GPA along with everything else she did without complaint and without help. I couldn’t be prouder of my girl and am glad she gets a few months off of her brutal schedule.

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What makes this a Fabulous Friday for you?

The post Fabulous Friday – 8 June 2018 appeared first on That's What She Read.


 

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